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Digital Forensic Survival Podcast

Listen to talk about computer forensic analysis, techniques, methodology, tool reviews and more.
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Digital Forensic Survival Podcast
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All Episodes
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Now displaying: Page 1
Jul 16, 2024

Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a crucial artifact in digital forensics due to its extensive use for remote system access. Analyzing RDP activities can uncover vital information about unauthorized access, insider threats, and attacker lateral movement within a network. Forensic examination of RDP logs enables investigators to trace an attacker's steps, identify compromised accounts, and assess the breach's extent. For instance, RDP forensics can detect brute force attacks on login credentials, track the use of stolen credentials, and monitor suspicious reconnection attempts to previously established sessions.

Jul 9, 2024

This week, I will be discussing the Linux operating system from a DFIR perspective. It is highly recommended for every examiner to become proficient in Linux, especially with the increasing prevalence of cloud-based infrastructures in enterprise environments. As these platforms become the norm, you can expect to encounter Linux systems frequently during your investigations.

Jul 2, 2024

In Windows forensics, understanding the intricacies of autorun functionalities and the Windows Registry is essential for effective incident response and investigation. Autorun mechanisms, which allow programs to execute automatically when the system starts or specific actions are performed, can be exploited by malicious actors to persist on a system. The Windows Registry, a hierarchical database that stores low-level settings for the operating system and applications, plays a crucial role in tracking these autorun entries. Forensic analysis of the Windows Registry can reveal information about auto-starting applications, system configurations, and user activities, providing insights into potential security breaches and unauthorized changes.

Jun 25, 2024

The JOHARI methodology simply provides a structure for something that you're probably already doing. However, with the structure comes a standard, which is the benefit to any security team. The team should be speaking the same language, especially in fast moving, dynamic situations. Going into a situation and asking for the "known – knowns” and “Blindspots" should register with every team member without any question about their definitions...

Jun 18, 2024

Threat actors often exploit PowerShell in cyber attacks due to its capabilities and integration with Windows operating systems. Microsoft has cited powershell as one of the most commonly used tools in the attack chain. It also comes up in phishing campaigns and other attacks that include infecting URL links. The challenge lies in the fact that it is a commonly used administration tool. As an analyst, you can expect to have lots of powershell scripts and commands come up during your investigations. Your job is to be able to differentiate between the good and bad. Fortunately, this episode is going to give you some tips and tricks on how to do exactly that...

Jun 11, 2024

The Windows registry is a hierarchical database that stores configuration settings and options on Microsoft Windows operating systems. It contains settings for low-level operating system components as well as for applications running on the platform. In order to make use of any of this information, you must understand the registry from a DFIR point of view, and that's exactly what I'm doing in this episode...

Jun 4, 2024

On a Linux or Mac system, there can be user accounts that have the ability of privilege escalation. Knowing how to triage, for this has a twofold benefit: (1) you obviously want to know which account may elevate to route privileges. If you're doing account triage, these are the ones you should prioritize. The other benefit (2) is to identify any account that can escalate. This fact alone ...

May 28, 2024

TCP control bits are part of the TCP header and are used to manage the connection between two devices. These control bits are single-bit flags that indicate various aspects of the TCP connection and are important for understanding and analyzing network traffic...

May 21, 2024

The time it takes from an initial escalation to the initial discovery of compromise is a key metric. Teams strive to do this as quickly as possible, but there are a number of challenges. You do not know what you're going to be handed, but you're pretty much guaranteed It's going to be a unique set of circumstances that require some type of customized or mostly customized response. So how do you accomplish this? Most analyst rely on a set of tried and true various techniques that can be used at scale. This week I'm going to cover a few of them, each being a critical technique you should be familiar with for forensic investigations...

May 14, 2024

Windows Scheduled Tasks are often used by attackers to establish persistence. As an analyst, you want to be aware of the different windows event codes that record these details. These artifacts come up in just about every windows compromise assessment, consider them core triage skills. There are several events, all of which I will go over in this episode. I will break them down from a DFIR point of view and give you the triage methodology...

May 7, 2024

This week I talk about career moves for the DFIR professional. The skill set is valuable, but it must be combined with the right additional technical skills to maximize future job opportunities. Of course, there is one skill set that stands out above the rest...

Apr 30, 2024

When you're triaging a Windows system for evidence of compromise, it's ideal if your plan is focused on some quick wins upfront. There are certain artifacts that offer this opportunity, and Windows Events for New Scheduled Tasks are one of them. Sometimes overlooked, at least in part, because the good stuff contained within the XML portion of the log. This week I'm covering the artifact from a DFIR point of view, I'll go over all the elements of the log entry that are of interest for investigations, and I'll provide a triage methodology that you can employ to find evidence quickly.

Apr 23, 2024

Windows management instrumentation, also known as WMI, is an App on Windows that allows a user to query all sorts of things about a system. Being native to Windows, it is an attractive target for a attackers to leverage. This week I'll break down the artifact from a DFIR point of a few and talk about how to detect its misuse.

Apr 16, 2024

This week I'm wrapping up my series on SSH forensics with a discussion on SSH log triage. Logs are usually what an analyst will start with, so this episode is important. There are a few different log types, and there is a pitfall with one of them, which is something you must be aware of to avoid making inaccurate conclusions. I'll provide the artifact breakdown, triage methodology, and more.

Apr 9, 2024

In the last episode on this topic, I covered SSH from a investigation point of view. I explained SSH and the artifacts that typically come up when your investigating. In this episode, we're getting into the triage methodology. This includes the artifacts targeted for a fast, but yet effective triage for notable SSH activity on a given host.

Apr 2, 2024

SSH is a protocol used to secure remote access to systems, making it a cornerstone in safeguarding sensitive information and ensuring secure communications. In this podcast, we will delve into the basics of SSH, its key concepts and other useful elements important for context when investigating for notable SSH activity.

Mar 26, 2024

This week I'm discussing a fundamental aspect of cybersecurity: incident response preparation. Effective incident response is paramount, and preparation is the key to success. This preparation includes comprehensive documentation, training, having the right tools and resources in place, and developing incident response plans and playbooks. It also involves ensuring clear communication protocols and conducting regular training and testing. 

I'll explore preparation from the perspective of the investigation life cycle, where success is the reward for preparation. Join me as I uncover the importance of preparation in incident response and how it lays the foundation for success in investigations.

Mar 19, 2024

Today I'm talking Windows forensics, focusing on Windows event logs. These logs are very valuable for fast triage, often readily available in your organization's SIEM. But have you ever wondered about the processes enabling this quick access? Not only are the logs automatically collected and fed into the appliance, but they are also formatted and normalized for easy data searchability. This is crucial, as the logs are originally in a complex format challenging to natively interpret. Now, picture a scenario where event logs are inaccessible through a security appliance—enter this week's topic: EVTX analysis options. Don't be caught unprepared.

Mar 12, 2024

In this podcast episode, we talk about Linux's `memfd` – a virtual file system allowing the creation of anonymous memory areas for shared memory or temporary data storage. Threat actors exploit `memfd` for fileless malware attacks, as its memory areas exist only in RAM, evading traditional file-based detection methods. Join me as I `memfd` as a forensic artifact, its implications in DFIR, and strategies for detecting its abuse.

Mar 5, 2024

This week we explore into the world of Windows service event codes and their role in forensic investigations. Windows services are background processes crucial for system functionality, running independently of user interaction- making them ideal. Target were exploitation. Join me to explore the intricate details of Windows services and their significance in digital forensics.

Feb 27, 2024

This week, we're delving into the realm of fast flux, a cunning technique employed by attackers to cloak their true, malicious domains. Its effectiveness is the reason behind its widespread use, making it crucial for analysts to grasp its nuances and avoid chasing elusive ghosts during investigations. Stay tuned as I unravel the intricacies of fast flux, providing insights into what it entails and offering valuable tips on how to effectively detect it. All this and more coming your way!

Feb 20, 2024

In this week's exploration, I'm delving into the intricate realm of the Master File Table (MFT), a pivotal forensic artifact in Windows investigations. The MFT provides a valuable gateway to decode evidence across various scenarios. Join me in this episode as we unravel the forensic basics, explore diverse use cases, and discover a range of tools that empower you to unlock the full potential of this invaluable artifact.

Feb 13, 2024

This week I delve into the intriguing domain of Linux malware triage. The Linux platform presents forensic analysts with a unique opportunity to excel in performing malware triage effortlessly. The beauty of it lies in the fact that you don't require any specialized tools; all you need is a solid grasp of a few commands and the ability to decipher their output. With these skills in your arsenal, any analyst can swiftly and efficiently navigate through the process of malware triage. Stay tuned for more insights on this in the upcoming discussion!

Feb 6, 2024

This week I’m going to talk about New Service Installation details recorded in Windows event logs. These have a number of advantages for your triage methodology and I will have all the details coming up. 

Jan 30, 2024

Organizations leverage third-party services more and more for business advantages. For the security professional, this means the organizational data you're charged with protecting is under the control of a third-party in some way shape or form. In this episode, I cover third-party risk landscape for security professionals with a special focus on identifying scope and responsibility.

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